“Flesh-eating disease” once again caused by failings in treatment

JS, a 70 year old lady, was admitted to hospital in the summer of 2016 with shingles.  She was suspected to also have a bacterial infection and was prescribed antibiotics.  Unfortunately, these were stopped when she was discharged 2 days later.

She was very unwell following her discharge and her GP arranged for her to be readmitted to hospital a week later.  She was once again diagnosed with a bacterial infection and prescribed antibiotics.  However, as the infection had been allowed to progress, her condition deteriorated but the hospital failed to address this.  In fact, on one day she was not reviewed at all despite her family raising concerns about her deterioration and the smell emanating from the wound on her hip.  They were simply reassured.

2 days later JS was seen by a Consultant who diagnosed necrotising fasciitis, more commonly known as the flesh-eating disease.  JS was taken by ambulance to a nearby hospital where she underwent surgery to remove the necrotic tissue.  Her family were warned by the surgeons that they had had to remove so much dead tissue, they likened the injury to that of a shark bite.  She required further surgery to apply a skin graft and was only fit for discharge nearly 3 months after her admission to hospital.

JS had to endure a horrific injury for 15 months until she sadly died unrelated to this incident.

Solicitors for the hospital admitted very quickly that antibiotic therapy should have continued after her discharge following her first admission.  It was our case, supported by expert evidence in microbiology and infectious diseases, that had the antibiotics continued, the infection would have fully resolved and the subsequent deterioration in her condition, readmission to hospital and need for surgery would have been avoided. However, this was denied by the hospital although they did admit her condition would not have been so severe but for their negligence.

The case was settled before court proceedings were issued.  Although the hospital did not formally admit the flesh eating disease was caused by their lack of treatment, the settlement reflected this.

If you are concerned you or a family member may have received negligent treatment and would like some free, no obligation advice, please contact us on 01642 231110 to speak to one of our solicitors.

Kathryn Watson – January 2020